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'The perfect best friend has Idris Elba's coolness'

COOL FACTOR: Idris Elba

WHETHER it’s being the ultimate wingman, ‘killing it’ on the dancefloor or laughing at your ‘unique’ brand of humour, best mates always have your back. But what makes the perfect one?

It turns out that British men have a very specific recipe for what they want from their closest ally – right down to their hair colour.

In fact, a study from menswear retailer, Jacamo, revealed the ideal bosom buddy stands at 5ft 7ins tall, has brown hair and weighs in at 11 stone. Oh, and he also has to be uglier.

Surprisingly, when asked to rank the most important qualities they wanted from a best mate, almost half (48%) of the 2,000 British men surveyed said that humour was more important than being loyal (41%).

Liking the same things came in third place with 28 per cent of the vote, followed by having good banter (25%), generosity (18%), being a good listener (18%) and being a capable drinking buddy (16%).

Contrary to popular belief, being a good wing man was a quality desired by only five per cent of British men. Being good at football (4%), laughing at your jokes (7%) and being honest enough to say if an outfit looks horrendous (6%) are also bottom of the wrung.

When it comes to nation’s perfect celebrity BFF, he would have a mixture of David Beckham’s footballer legs, Peter Kay’s humour, the coolness of Idris Elba, Freddie Flintoff’s cricketer arms and even the public speaking skills of Barack Obama.

Personality and Behavioural psychologist, Donna Dawson said: “The survey reveals that a man’s ‘ultimate best mate’ is similar to himself in levels of attractiveness, sportiness, fashion sense and sense of humour, but who is less physically imposing in height and weight. This subtle difference reveal’s men’s innate competitiveness with each other.

“Being married is also a ‘plus’ for the best mate, as there will be no chance of losing a girlfriend to him. And in today’s stressful world, it seems that the ability to make people laugh and thus temporarily forget their problems is worth more than wealth or intelligence.”

Although one in five British men met their best friend in secondary school, 17 per cent admit to not having one. This is especially true for under 18-24 year olds and over 55s, with one in five men in both age groups who aren’t yet in a bromance.

Dawson highlighted that “a best mate needs to be able to move in the same social circles and not be an embarrassment, but he should not share the same degree of ‘physical presence’ as the man who befriends him”.

Jenni Bamford from Jacamo added: “Our study has revealed some of the top qualities men in the UK look for in a soulmate. It’s great to see that humour comes out tops in the personality pecking order - and who wouldn’t want a best mate who’s a diverse mixture of David Beckham, Idris Elba, Freddie Flintoff and Peter Kay?”

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