Custom Search 1

Teaching

Teaching is an important and increasingly popular choice of career for all kinds of people.

Whatever your circumstances – if you’re about to graduate, or looking for a change of direction – there are more ways to enter the profession than ever before.

To ensure teaching is the right career choice for you, it makes sense to get some classroom experience.

Training providers want to know that you have the skills and motivation to teach, and you will usually be expected to have experience of working with children of the relevant age, preferably in a school environment.

Teacher training explained
If you want to teach in state primary or secondary schools in England, Wales or Scotland, you need to complete one of the following types of course successfully:

  • An initial teacher training (ITT) course in England or Wales that gives you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
  • An initial teacher education (ITE) course in Scotland the gives you the Teaching Qualification (TQ).

If you are not a graduate, you can apply through UCAS. for 3 or 4-year undergraduate degree courses that provide QTS or the TQ.

If you are a graduate or expect to have a degree by September 2011, you can apply through the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR) for Professional Graduate or Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) courses in England and Wales and for Professional Graduate Diploma of Education (PGDE) courses in Scotland. Most of these courses are full-time and last one academic year, but the Course types section provides information about the different kinds of course provision.

If you successfully complete a primary, middle years or secondary teaching course in the GTTR scheme, you will have the Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) which you need to teach in state schools in England and Wales or the Teaching Qualification (TQ) which is required to teach in Scottish schools. Many schools in the independent sector will also require you to have QTS or the TQ, even though this is not a government requirement.
In England you can take a PGCE course based at a university or college, or take a school-based course run by groups of schools that have formed school-centred initial teacher training (SCITT) consortia.

University and college courses normally incude lectures at the institution and school-based training in at least two of their partnership schools. Primary teaching courses include at least 18 weeks of school-based training and if you are taking a secondary teaching course, you will spend a minimum of 24 weeks training in schools.

SCITT consortia run their courses almost entirely within their member schools. Each consortium will offer training in primary or secondary schools. You will usually be based in the 'lead school' and undertake teaching placements at other schools within the consortium. Teachers in the schools act as mentors to organise and monitor your training. Most SCITT consortia run courses that have been validated by a university or college for the award of their PGCE. You may be required to attend some lectures at this university or college as part of your school-based course.

There are currently no SCITT consortia in Wales or Scotland, but some consortia in England may use schools in Wales to deliver their training.

All PGCE courses in Wales and PGDE courses in Scotland are based in universities or colleges of higher education.

We refer to universities, colleges and schools' consortia that offer teacher training courses as 'training providers' on this website.

The GTTR does not receive applications for teacher training courses in Northern Ireland. For information about these courses, please visit the Department for Education in Northern Ireland's website.

Where to train
Deciding where to do your teacher training can seem like a difficult task because there are so many training providers to choose from. You may wish to remain close to home or decide to live in a different part of the country: your choice may depend upon training providers' facilities. In England you can take a course based in a university or college or in a consortium of schools. Whatever your criteria, it is important that you research training providers and their locations before applying.

Most training providers will have course Entry Profiles on Course Search, websites and a prospectus that provide information about their teacher training courses. You can also attend open days to discover the good and bad points about a place.

Which is the best training provider?
There is no one training provider which is perfect for everyone: different places suit different people, so it depends upon your preferences. The Training and Development Agency for Schools' website provides training providers' performance profiles that you may find useful.

Entry Profiles
What are Entry Profiles?
GTTR Entry Profiles can help you make that important decision about which training providers to apply to for your postgraduate teacher training. While teacher training courses will qualify you to teach your subject, the experience will be very different according to the training provider you choose. Which one will suit you best? Do you prefer a school-based course or a college-based course? Will you be happier at a city university, a small college, or a village school? Each offers a unique experience. But which one is for you?

If you are thinking about training as a teacher, you will need to gather and consider a lot of information before you are ready to make a choice. Entry Profiles provide details about the course, about the training provider offering the course, and the information you need about entry qualifications, selection criteria and the provider's admissions policy. This information is essential to enable you to make fully informed choices about the courses for which you will ultimately choose to apply.

Entry Profiles offer invaluable guidance to any graduate choosing a teacher training course. They are compiled by the staff at each training provider, who understand the kind of details you need to know about their courses, and what kind of personal qualities, interests and experiences will be helpful for you to have, in order to be a successful student on the course, and a successful teacher in your chosen subject.

What are Entry Profiles for?
To provide important information for anyone interested in applying for a postgraduate teacher training course.

To help you understand what it would be like to be a trainee teacher with that training provider.

To let you know what the entry requirements are in terms of academic subjects or relevant experience.

To describe the course in detail.

To give you information about the training provider that is offering the course. Where are they? How far away from your home are they? What facilities do they offer? Is childcare available? Do they offer accommodation? Can they provide support if you have special needs?

To let you know what interests, personal qualities, or relevant experience the admissions staff might be looking for in their applicants.
To explain the training provider's admissions policy and selection procedures, including (where applicable) information about interviews.

How do I find Entry Profiles on the web?

• Entry Profiles can be found on GTTR Course Search.
• When you click on the course title you will see headings, and by clicking on any one of them, you will find more information. The first heading is 'Why train with us', which will give you information about the training provider. These differ greatly, depending on whether the training provider is large or small, a city university or a village school. You will also see headings about the course, entry requirements, selection procedures and the training provider.

Once I have found an Entry Profile on Course Search, what should I look for?
Read the information about the course. Ask yourself if this course covers the aspects of teaching that particularly interest you. Does it have the flexibility you might be looking for? How will it be taught? Will the course give you the opportunity to increase your knowledge of the subject?

Does the Entry Profile tell you about the personal qualities the training provider is looking for in applicants for that course? Does their description sound like you? Do you have the experience they say would be beneficial in their applicants, or the time to acquire it before you apply? Do you think this course will suit you?

Check the academic entry requirements. Are you studying the right subjects for entry to this course? Will you need GCSE qualifications in maths, English or science?

Make sure that you know where the course will be taught - sometimes it is not at the main campus. Will you be able to travel to lectures and tutorials easily, if you live some distance away? Will you need to travel far for the school placements?

Many Entry Profiles provide detailed information about the interview. Look for specific information about this, so that you know what to expect.

The Entry Profiles are subject to a process of continuous development and updating. To help us with this task, we welcome your comments. Please send them to coursesdata@ucas.ac.uk.

Academic requirements
Academic requirements for entry to courses in England and Wales
Primary, middle years and secondary teaching courses
Before you can start a PGCE course in primary, middle years or secondary teaching in England or Wales you must have:

  • a degree awarded by a UK university or college or a recognised equivalent qualification and be able to show that you have
  • the knowledge of English required to obtain a GCSE at grade C.
  • the knowledge of mathematics required to obtain a GCSE at grade C.

If you want to take a PGCE course in primary or middle years teaching, you must also be able to show that you have:

  • the knowledge of a science subject required to obtain a GCSE at grade C.

Training providers are responsible for assessing your knowledge of English, mathematics and, if applicable, science. They may be able to ascertain that you have the required knowledge of these subjects from your qualifications or work experience. Some training providers may ask you to take their own equivalency tests in English, mathematics and/or science to assess your knowledge. There is more information about equivalency tests below.

For further information about the minimum entry requirements for entry to postgraduate teacher training courses in England, visit the TDA website

Post-compulsory and further education courses
Before you start a course for post-compulsory or further education teaching in England or Wales, you must have a degree awarded by a UK university or college or a recognised equivalent qualification. You do not need to have GCSEs at grade C or higher in English, mathematics or science as standard entry requirements for these courses, but some training providers may ask for one or more of these qualifications. You must read the Entry Profiles on www.link.com Course Search and visit the training providers' websites to find out the specific entry requirements for their courses before you apply.

There are no training providers in Scotland that recruit for post-compulsory or further education courses through the GTTR.

Academic requirements for entry to courses in Scotland
Primary teaching courses
Before you can start a postgraduate Initial Teacher Education (ITE) course in primary teaching in Scotland, you must have:

  • a degree from a UK university or college. Degree equivalent qualifications are not acceptable
  • a National Qualifications Course award in English at level 6 or above in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) or an equivalent qualification
  • a National Qualifications Course award in mathematics at level 5 or above in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) or an equivalent qualification.

The training providers will also want to ensure that your education provides the necessary foundation for working as a primary teacher. In addition to English and mathematics, they will also normally look for evidence that you have studied at least two of science, social studies, expressive arts, religious and moral education, technology or modern languages.

Secondary teaching courses
Before you can start a postgraduate Initial Teacher Education (ITE) course in secondary teaching in Scotland, you must have

  • a degree from a UK university or college or an equivalent that contains sufficient breadth and depth in the subject(s) you intend to teach
  • a National Qualifications Course award in English at level 6 or above in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) or an equivalent.

You do not need a qualification in mathematics to take a course for secondary teaching in Scotland.

For further information about the entry requirements for ITE courses in Scotland, visit the Scottish Government's website. http://www.teachinginscotland.com/

Finding the specific entry requirements for courses
The previous sections list the standard minimum academic requirements for entry to courses in England, Wales and Scotland. Training providers may have higher academic or other requirements for entry to their courses. For example, they may ask for a specific class of degree (2:2, 2:1 or First) or if you want to take a course in Spanish or German teaching, they may also require a Higher in French. Most providers will ask you to obtain some experience of working in a school before starting your course
You must read the Entry Profiles on Course Search and visit the training providers' websites to find out the specific entry requirements for your chosen courses before you apply.

Equivalent UK qualifications
If you think you have other UK qualifications that might be equivalent to a degree or to GCSEs at grade C in English, mathematics or science, you must contact the training providers for a final decision before you make your application. The GTTR cannot advise you whether or not your qualifications are acceptable for entry to postgraduate teacher training.

You have non-UK qualifications
Before you apply through the GTTR you should obtain a comparability letter from The National Academic Recognition Centre for the United Kingdom (UK NARIC) to confirm whether or not you have non - UK qualifications that are comparable to:

  • a UK degree
  • GCSEs at grade C in English and mathematics
  • GCSE at grade C in science (only required if you are applying for primary or middle years teaching courses).

If UK NARIC sends you a letter to confirm you have qualifications that are comparable to all the above UK qualifications, you can apply through the GTTR. After you have applied, each time we tell you that your application has been sent to a training provider for consideration, you must send a copy of UK NARIC's letter to that training provider.
If UK NARIC is unable to confirm that you have qualifications that are comparable to all the above UK qualifications, you must discuss your qualifications with training providers before you apply through the GTTR.

For further information about the comparability of qualifications, visit the UK NARIC website http://www.naric.org.uk/

Equivalency tests

You may not be able to show that you have the required knowledge of English, mathematics and/or science before courses start. If so, some training providers may be able to offer you equivalency tests to assess your knowledge of these subjects for entry to their courses. You must contact your chosen providers to find out whether or not they can offer you these tests before you apply.

A pass in one training provider's equivalency test is not usually acceptable for entry to courses at other training providers. You would need to take tests at each training provider that is interested in offering you a place.