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VIDEO: Bleaching Cream Popstar: 'White Means Pure'

Cameroonian pop star slams Lupita Nyong'o while attempting to defend her skin lightening product
Posted: 24/03/2014 02:22 PM
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AFRICAN POP princess Dencia dismissed Lupita Nyong'o's warnings of skin bleaching as she attempted to justify her skin-bleaching cream during a TV interview.

The Nigerian and Cameroonian singer made headlines after she launched the product, Whitenicious, in January.

The cream, which is advertised as a "Seven-day fast-acting dark spot remover,” reportedly sold out in just one day.

Recently, Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong'o spoke out against racism in beauty and fashion and warned young black girls not to use bleaching products.

The 12 Years A Slave star admitted that when she was younger she wanted to wake up 'just a little bit lighter', because she was ashamed of her dark skin.

During an interview with Channel 4, Dencia said: “I don't care about her story. I don't know her.”

“I'm an adult and if I lighten my skin then that's my choice, the same as bleaching my hair.”

Highlighting critics branding the product an 'abomination', Dencia was asked whether she thought the message behind the product was that being white looked better than being black.

She replied: “I was not selling that message, the media are selling that message. I didn't say, ‘buy the cream and look like Dencia'.

“I said 'seven day, fast acting dark spot remover’. It's called reading comprehension. If people missed that class then it's not my fault.

“If they think that their whole body is a dark spot then fine, because that's not how I feel.”

Defending the product’s name, Dencia said: “White means pure, not necessarily skin, but in general,” and she insisted that the cream is only for covering blemishes, despite the advertising campaign showing her entire body appearing several shades lighter.

Phinnah Ikeji, founder of Black Role Models UK, tried to get Dencia to see the damaging message Whitenicious might be sending to young women.

Ikeji said: “For young girls…they see you, they love your music, they love you as a person. They’ve seen that you were darker before and now you’re much lighter. What’s the message going to be to them?”